CARC Project

The CARC Project is an easy to use Windows only freeware call sign lookup program written by CARC member Steve Low, W9SML.

The CARC Project uses a database that can be updated with a free download from the FCC.

Follow the instructions in the help file to install the downloaded database.

Basic Callsign Search

Basic Callsign Search

Custom Callsign Search

Custom Callsign Search

CARCweb (20.4 MiB, 248 downloads)

Remote Base in a Box

Picture of the Project taken Dec 25, 2010

Picture of the Project taken Dec 25, 2010

Dale Buchanan, KC9FQ, has been working a project using old components from the WB9AEP Repeater station.

The current plan is to use these components to configure a stand-alone remote base to be used for repeater linking, user accessable functions such as National Weather Service updates, transmission playback, announcements and many other possibilties.  Other suggestions include configuring it to hook up to the Red Cross tower or the club’s portable tower in case of emergencies.

The project currently includes the following components:

ARCOM RC-210 Repeater Controller
ICOM IC-2720 Dual-Band Programmable Receiver
Johnson  PPL 600 2 ch crystal 70cm transceiver  1 channel installed
Motorola MaxTrac 2 channel non – field programmable 70cm transceiver

The following components still need to be added:

Unified Microsystems SCI-6 Sound Card Interface
Motron AK-1B DTMF DTMF controller
Various circuit boards, relays, connectors, etc.

Club Member Builds Big Key!

An oversize Morse hand key has become the official “mascot” of the West Virginia Wesleyan College ARC. Arnold, W8WVM, the secretary of the club, sent this photo of the key, with a standard J-38 in the foreground for size reference. Arnold makes no claim as the key’s builder, but it looks suspiciously like something he would do!

An oversize Morse hand key has become the official “mascot” of the West Virginia Wesleyan College ARC. Arnold, W8WVM, the secretary of the club, sent this photo of the key, with a standard J-38 in the foreground for size reference. Arnold makes no claim as the key’s builder, but it looks suspiciously like something he would do!

This project was built by former CARC President Steven Low, W9SML.

Steve writes,

Marion Winterberg, WD9HTN, gave away old copies of QST magazine at the September 1998 meeting of the Columbus Amateur Radio Club. Inside the May 1996 issue I found this photograph and story on page 20 of “Up Front in QST:”

I thought this would be a challenging project for myself and could be a contribution to my local club. I somewhat underestimated just how challenging it would become. I looked up the address and phone number for Mr. Sayre through the Internet. He was very helpful when I gave him a call. He offered to send more information to me via the mail. I received an envelope in early October. It included another photo of the “big key” and an exquisitely detailed miniature key.

Two pages of instructions included general guidance, hardware descriptions, and some very helpful drawings of the project. I was overwhelmed by the attention to detail. The base of the key is covered in Formica and features a built-in code oscillator. This is a working model!

I began my project in mid-September by constructing a 6x12x2 inch base of poplar with 1/4″ plywood top and bottom. This was to be the easiest part of the construction. The “Arnold” key had been constructed with such craftsmanship as detailed adjustment screws that were fashioned with the use of a metal lathe. I had no prior experience with such equipment and after showing the pictures to those who I thought might be of help, came to realize these might prevent the completion of the model. I scoured through our local hardware stores and purchased a peculiar assortment of fasteners that I mocked up to find an acceptable alternative. The project advanced only in my mind for a couple of weeks as I laid out the many bolts, screws, and aluminum channel. My trips down the hardware aisles became a daily routine.

A hobby store provided the flat aluminum and copper plates I chose to provide the conductive top of my key. The copper is a visual contrast to the brass adjustments I had settled on and gives it a distinctive look. Some aluminum stock came from the racks of a metal fabrication shop.

Another difference in detail is in my yoke configuration. The “Arnold” key, as best I can tell, consists of two individual uprights. I found it easier to stabilize a U-shaped yoke that was formed by scoring flat rod with a hacksaw and carefully bending in a vise.

Within my limitations I attempted to duplicate the key contacts but had little success producing any samples that had a uniform tapered look. I visited electronic and auto shops trying to find suitable points to cap the contacts.

I proceeded to piece together the model and scrutinized each piece for appearance and function. I settled on a functional but simpler contact arrangement made of straight 3/8″ aluminum rod topped with gold plated contacts from a large audio system fuse. The gold ends of the fuse slipped neatly into place over the rod and were secured with “Lock-tite”. The Knob was cut from 1/2″ oak and painted flat black. I found the same paint treatment acceptable for the base.

I purchased a code oscillator kit from “Electronic Rainbow”. The kit was assembled per the instructions and attached to the key from inside the base.

About six weeks had passed from that first trip to the hardware store to the completed project. I wish to thank Arnold Sayre, W8WVM, for the inspiration and for the correspondence. I presented my key at the November meeting of my local club.